Tag Archives: Homophones

This Author’s Pen: A Four-for Nightmare

A homophone is a word that is pronounced the same as another word but differs in meaning. Most homophones sets are composed of two or at most three words that are pronounced the same, but have different meanings. What brought this one on was MY OWN error when carelessly writing. Thanks to my editor extraordinaire, it didn’t make it to print, but was a source of embarrassment. The homophones of the week are peak, peek, pique, and pique.

Peak.  n. summit, highest point

v. to reach the extent of one’s abilities

Peek n. a quick or surreptitious glance.

v. to look at quickly or sneakily.

Pique n. annoyance or resentment.

Pique v. to arouse or excite esp. in response to challenge

Tomorrow, Pics of the Weekend  Rita Bay

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An Author’s Pen: More Homophones

Good JobRan across these homophones a week or so ago. “Compliment” and “complement” were originally used interchangeably but are distinguished in modern usage. Both can be used either as a noun or verb. “Compliment” is the most often used word, meaning “to say something nice,” with ” the compliment” being the noun and “to compliment,” the verb. Whenever you’re not saying something nice, “complement” which refers to matching or completing is correct.

Tomorrow, A FREE Giveaway (How’s that for redundant?)  Rita Bay

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Horrible Homophones: To, Too, & Two

Homophones, also known as sound-alike words, are words that are pronounced identically although they have different spellings and meanings. The horrific homophones of to, too, and two are often confused.
      Check out the example below:
      The to of us want too go to the movie, two.
The homophones are used incorrectly because “TO” is a preposition used to (1) indicate the place, person, or thing that someone or something moves toward, or the direction of something, (2) to indicate a time or a period or (3) to indicate a limit or an ending point, “TWO” is the number, and “TOO” is a conjunction which means “in addition” or “also.”

      So, the correction should read:
      The two of us want to go to the theatre, too.
Tomorrow, A Writer’s Desk. Rita Bay

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Those Horrific Homophones

Homophones, also known as sound-alike words, are words that are pronounced identically although they have different spellings and meanings.

THE HOMOPHONES OF THE DAY: there, their, and they’re

There going on vacation today.

Where will they leave they’re pet?

We can’t go their.

ALL of the above are WRONG.

THERE is used when referring to a place, whether concrete or more abstract.  Also use there with the verb BE (is, am, are, was, were) to indicate the existence of something, or to mention something for the first time.

THEIR is used to indicate possession. It is a possessive adjective and indicates that a particular noun belongs to them.

THEY’RE is used a contraction of the words they and are. It is only used as a subject (who or what  does the action) and verb (the action itself).

The fix on the sentences above are:

They’re going on vacation today.

Where will they leave their pet?

We can’t go there.

Next week’s This Writer’s Pen, More Horrific Homophones     Rita Bay

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